/ / What Is Kwanzaa, When Is It, And How Should I Celebrate It?

What Is Kwanzaa, When Is It, And How Should I Celebrate It?

What Is Kwanzaa, When Is It, And How Should I Celebrate It

How To Celebrate Kwanzaa, Are There Groups Or Events?

How To Celebrate Kwanzaa, Are There Groups Or Events

It depends where you live.

If you reside in a city with a high African American population, you might be inundated with Kwanzaa events! Events typically include feasts, movie screenings, kids’ events, and shows with dancing, drumming and storytelling. Wheat Street Baptist Church in Atlanta even holds a Pre-Kwanzaa Achievers Ball!

Have a look on the internet for Kwanzaa events in your city. If you don’t have anything going on where you are, why not take a trip for the holidays? You could stay in a hotel in Chicago or Atlanta, for example, and soak in all the cultural offerings the Kwanzaa season has to offer in these vibrant cities.

If travel’s not an option, you can stay at home to celebrate. Why not invite some of your family, friends and neighbors to join in? Kwanzaa is traditionally a home-based celebration, anyway, just like Christmas. You can cook up some delicious food, light up those Kwanzaa candles, and enjoy some cultural bonding time with your family and friends in the comfort of your own home.

The 7 Principles Of Kwanzaa, What They Are And What They Mean

The 7 Principles Of Kwanzaa, What They Are And What They Mean

The first thing you have to know about Kwanzaa is that it’s based on seven principles. These are called the Nguzo Saba, which literally translates into… you guessed it… seven principles! Karenga put these together to be “the best of African thought and practice in constant exchange with the world”.

You’ll remember that Kwanzaa is seven days long. We celebrate one principle per day. Let’s have a look at each of the principles, when they are celebrated, and what they represent:

On December 26th we celebrate the principle of Umoja (Unity) – To strive for and to maintain unity in the family, community, nation and race.

On December 27th we celebrate the principle of Kujichagulia (Self-Determination) – To define and name ourselves, as well as to create and speak for ourselves.

On December 28th we celebrate the principle of Ujima (Collective Work and Responsibility) – To build and maintain our community together and make our brothers’ and sisters’ problems our problems and to solve them together.

On December 29th we celebrate the principle of Ujamaa (Cooperative Economics) – To build and maintain our own stores, shops, and other businesses and to profit from them together.

On December 30th we celebrate the principle of Nia (Purpose) – To make our collective vocation the building and developing of our community in order to restore our people to their traditional greatness.

On December 31st we celebrate the principle of Kuumba (Creativity) – To do always as much as we can, in the way we can, in order to leave our community more beautiful and beneficial than we inherited it.

On January 1st we celebrate the principle of Imani (Faith) – To believe with all our hearts in our people, our parents, our teachers, our leaders, and the righteousness and victory of our struggle. 

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